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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 886-890

Hyponatremia in hospitalized children with bronchiolitis and severe bronchial asthma


1 Department of Pediatric, Faculty of Medicine, Student's Hospital, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt
2 Department of Pediatric, Student's Hospital, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Manal A Elsayed Yousef
Shebin Elkom, Menoufia
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mmj.mmj_46_19

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Objective The main objective is to study the frequency of hyponatremia in hospitalized children with bronchiolitis and severe bronchial asthma and its relation to severity of the disease. Background Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality seen in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchiolitis and bronchial asthma. Patients and methods This is a case–control study, involving 69 cases of bronchiolitis and 31 cases of severe bronchial asthma, conducted in Menoufia University Hospitals from November 2017 to April 2018. All cases were subjected to history taking, clinical assessment, and investigations, including complete blood count, C-reactive protein, serum urea, serum creatinine, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, serum sodium, and serum potassium. Results The age of bronchiolitis cases ranged from 1 to 24 months of life, with mean age of 7.39 ± 7.63 months, whereas the age of severe bronchial asthma cases ranged from 36–138 months of life, with mean age of 56.71 ± 25.0 months. Clinical presentation of bronchiolitis was cough (100%), fever (40.8%), and poor feeding (55%), whereas that of patients with severe asthma was cough (100%), wheezy chest (67.7%), dyspnea (38.7%), and tight chest (25.8%). Incidence of hyponatremia in patients with bronchiolitis was 5.8% whereas in patients with severe bronchial asthma was 25.8%. Conclusion Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchiolitis and bronchial asthma. The incidence of hyponatremia increased with the severity of the disease.


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