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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1066-1070

Self-medication among the attendants to a family health center in Al Sadat city, Menoufia Governorate


1 Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin Elkom, Egypt
2 Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin Elkom, Egypt
3 Family Medicine, Al Sadat City Family Health Center, Alsadat Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Sabah A Mohammed
Family Medicine, Al Sadat City Family Health Center, Alsadat Menoufia, Sadat, 32897
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.202509

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Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of self-medication among attendants to a family health center and identify the determinants of participants practising self-medication. Background Self-medication is the selection and use of medicines by individuals to treat self-recognized illnesses or symptoms. It includes the use of nonprescription drugs and a range of different alternative medicines such as herbal remedies and traditional products. In most illness episodes, self-medication is the first option, making it a common practice worldwide. Materials and methods In this cross-sectional study, a validated self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data among attendants in the studied area. The study was conducted in a family health center in Al Sadat city, Menoufia governorate, Egypt, from April 2014 to March 2015. The sample size of the study was 368 participants. Results Of the 368 participants, 47.8% were males and the remaining 52.2% were females –71.5% were in the age group of 12–65 years. Overall, 32.6% participants were students, whereas 35.3% were unemployed; 66.8% of the participants consumed over the counter (OTC) medications. The most common source of information about self-medication was pharmacist (37%). Minor illness (39.8%) and previous good experience (17.9%) were the most frequent reasons for self-medication. Conclusion Easy availability of OTC drugs is a major factor responsible for the consequences such as antimicrobial resistance and increased load of morbidity. There is a need for concerned authorities to make existing laws regarding the purchase of OTC drugs more stringent for their rational use.


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