Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 333-339

Clinical outcome and survival of breast cancer patients treated at the Clinical Oncology Department, Menoufia University


Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Rasha A Mohamed Abdel Moneum
Demonstrator of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Quisna, Shebin El Kom, Menoufia, 32512
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.163881

Rights and Permissions

Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of clinicopathological features and treatment modalities on clinical outcome and survival of breast cancer patients. Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in developed as well as in some developing countries. In Egypt, breast cancer constitutes 33% of all female cancer cases. Axillary nodal metastases, HER-2 status, stage of disease, and appropriate treatment are the most important factors affecting survival. Patients and methods This study included 972 patients with breast cancer who presented at the Clinical Oncology Department, Menoufia University, from January 2000 until December 2004. Data on patient and disease characteristics and treatment modalities were collected from files, and clinical outcome and survival data were reported. Results It was found that the mean age of the patients was 48.55 years (range 23-86 years). Female patients represented 99% and male patients represented 1% of cases. Among the female patients, 52.3% were premenopausal and 46.7% were postmenopausal. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) was the most common (94.2%) type of cancer. Stage III was the most frequently seen stage (46.7%), followed by stage II (39.5%). Modified radical mastectomy (MRM) was the most common type of surgery performed (91.4%). In early-stage breast cancer (stages I and II), the median overall survival was 65 months and the median Disease free survival (DFS) was 55 months. There was a statistically significant correlation between overall survival and nodal status, HER-2 status, type of surgery, hormonal treatment, and site of relapse on univariate and multivariate analyses. In stage III, the median overall survival was 42 months and the median DFS was 26 months. In stage IV, the median overall survival was 17 months and the median progression-free survival was 10 months. Conclusion Axillary nodal metastases, HER-2 status, stage of disease, and appropriate treatment options are strong factors affecting the survival of breast cancer patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed925    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded124    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal