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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 474-477

Study on nitric oxide level in septicemic neonates


Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Samar Moustafa El Hak
MBBCh, Al Menshawy General Hospital, Al Amrya Al Mahalla Al Kubra Al Gharbya Governorate
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.141731

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Objectives The aim of this work was to study on the clinical importance of nitric oxide (NO) level in neonatal septicemia. Background Diagnosis of neonatal septicemia is very important. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of NO in the diagnosis of neonatal septicemia in the neonatal ICU of Menoufia University. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 50 neonates (30 septic and 20 healthy neonates). All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, through clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations (complete blood count, C-reactive protein, blood culture, and serum NO level). Results The serum level of NO was increased in all studied septic neonates, in comparison with the control group. The elevation in the NO level is independent of gestational age, and there was no significant relation between the NO level and neonatal body weight. The elevation in the NO level is independent of the onset of sepsis, with a cutoff value of 43.7 ΅mol/l. Conclusion Serum levels of NO were elevated in newborn infants with sepsis. Serum NO can be added to the sepsis screen for the early prediction of neonatal sepsis.


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