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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 115-121

Effect of 3-month treatment of obesity by low-calorie diet on anthropometric, health, and nutritional status for obese female individuals


Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Home Economics, Menoufia University, Shibin Al Kawm, Menoufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Olfat M Ibrahim Nassar
PhD, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Home Economics, Menoufia University, Shibin Al Kawm, Menoufia
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.132779

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Background In the majority of obese patients, adjustment of the diet will be required to reduce calorie intake. In general, diets containing 1000-1200 kcal/day should be selected for obese patients. Objective The objective was to study the effect of treatment by low-calorie diet on obese female individuals for 3 months. Participants Forty obese female individuals (BMI΃40 kg/m 2 ) with ages ranging from 27 to 30 years were divided into two main groups: the nontreated group (n = 20) in which obese female individuals did not follow any diet and the treated group (n = 20) in which obese female individuals consumed low-calorie diet (LCD) containing 1200 kcal as 60 g protein, 165 g carbohydrate, and 33 g fats for 3 months. Materials and methods Food intakes, anthropometric measurements, follow-up weights, and blood samples were studied. Results After weight-loss phase, the anthropometric measurements (weight, hips, waist circumference, and BMI) for the treated group (consumed LCD) were decreased significantly. The mean serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the treated group were decreased significantly (P < 0.001) at the end of weight-loss phase, whereas serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was increased but insignificantly when compared with the nontreated group. Serum red blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet in the treated group were decreased significantly at the end of weight-loss phase (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05), whereas in the nontreated group after the same time they were slightly increased (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001) except WBC and platelet, which decreased. The mean values of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glucose, uric acid, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen in the treated group were decreased significantly (P < 0.001) compared with that in the nontreated group with slightly increased values, but the differences were insignificant. All obese patients (n = 40) before weight-loss phase (3 months) consumed a diet rich in energy, protein, and micronutrients (calcium, iron, vitamin A, C, D, B6, and B12). However, the weight-loss phase treated group (n = 20) (consumed LCD) consumed a diet that had reduced requirements (DRI) for energy, calcium, iron, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, and vitamin B6 by 54.5, 22.58, 36, 48.31, 83.33, 64.0, and 12.5%, respectively, whereas they consumed a diet that had increased requirements for total protein and vitamin B12. Hence, consumed LCD has a positive role in controlling body weight, anthropometric measurements, and health status but has a negative impact on nutritional status because it lacks some of the nutrients. Conclusion Body weight reduction after LCD has a positive impact on anthropometric measurements and health status but has a negative impact on nutritional status because it lacks some of the nutrients.


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