Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 98-104

Kidney injury molecule-1 as an early marker for acute kidney injury in critically ill patients


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Menufia, Egypt
2 Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Menufia, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Karim S Mahmoud
MBBCh, 117 Rageb Basha street, Tanta, Gharbia 31111
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-2098.126131

Rights and Permissions

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) as an early marker for acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients as compared with conventional markers (e.g. serum creatinine). Background Depending on traditional markers for renal functions, namely, blood urea and serum creatinine, has led to unacceptable delay in the diagnosis of AKI and in initiating treatment. Materials and methods This study included 89 individuals: 79 critically ill patients and 10 healthy individuals who served as controls. All patients were prospectively followed up from the time of ICU admission. Blood and urine samples were collected simultaneously at predetermined time points: at the time of ICU admission, 6 h after arriving, 12 h after arriving, and daily thereafter for a minimum of the next 2 days and a maximum of 5 days. Results KIM-1 can detect AKI as early as 6 h from its occurrence and before the elevation of conventional markers. KIM-1 is (unlike conventional markers) not influenced by age, sex, and BMI. Conclusion KIM-1 is a reliable indicator for early detection of AKI in critically ill patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2509    
    Printed11    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded138    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal